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Special lectures

The Corbett Lecture

The Corbett Lecture is an annual lecture by a distinguished scholar on a theme connected with ancient Greece.

17 November 2016

'Of prickly heroes, powerful gods, and puzzled sailors - or how much Indo-European did Homer know?'
Andreas Willi (Diebold Professor of Comparative Philology, University of Oxford)
5pm in Room G.19, Faculty of Classics

Many of the differences between Homeric and Classical Greek are due to the chronological and/or dialectal gap separating the two varieties, and the ‘artificial’ element in epic language is also commonly acknowledged. Sometimes, however, there are divergences which do not easily fit into one of these moulds. Focusing on the Homeric verb, we will explore some particularly well-known features of the latter kind – augmentation patterns, the absence of historical presents, and the use of past iteratives – and ask to what extent comparative and typological linguistics can help to account for Homeric usage and where Homeric language in its turn necessitates a revision of conventional Indo-Europeanist doctrine.

The lecture is open to all members of the University and others who are interested.

 

JH Gray Lectures

The Gray Lectures 2017 will be delivered by Professor John Clarke of the University of Texas at Austin.

Lectures:

9 May 2017 at 5pm: New Scientific Methods and Discoveries at Villa A and Oplontis B, Torre Annunziata, Italy

11 May 2017 at 5pm: The Look of Luxury and the Framework for Commerce at Oplontis

Lectures will be in Room G.19, Faculty of Classics.

Seminar:

10 May at 2 pm: The Digital Humanities and Archaeology: 3D Modeling, Linked Databases, and Electronic Publication

The Seminar will be in Room 1.11, Faculty of Classics.

This year's J. H. Gray lectures, delivered by Professor John Clarke of the University of Texas at Austin, transport their audience to the Roman town of Oplontis (modern Torre Annunziata), a site that like Herculaneum was buried in the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE. The lectures will explore two different kinds of building there, one an elite villa and the other a busy centre for the bottling and shipping of wine, and they will demonstrate how modern technologies such as geo-archaeology and isotopic analysis are throwing new light on the most important questions of social and economic history.

The lectures and seminar are open to all members of the University and others who are interested.

Further information about recent Corbett and Gray Lectures is available via the archive pages.

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