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Part IA courses in the Easter Term

PLEASE NOTE THAT, FOR THIS TERM ONLY, LECTURES AND CLASSES FOR PART 1A, RUN FROM THE FIRST MONDAY OF FULL-TERM (and not the first Thursday).

Your work in this term is preparatory for Part 1B, to which lectures and supervisions look forward. For full details of how Part 1B is structured, see the ‘Part 1B’ section of the course descriptions. The examination in 2018 will follow the same format as in 2017; any changes in syllabus for second year work in 2017/18 will be announced in 2016/17.

 

Paper 1: Greek Language and Texts

READING CLASSES: HOMER, Iliad 1, 6, 24 and Odyssey 6 and 8

MR F G G BASSO
(14C: Easter, weeks 1-7)

The minimal aim for these classes will be to read at least one book  from among those prescribed and a portion of another, but some classes may be able to complete the reading of both. 

The editions of the Greek text that will be used in class (a copy will be provided) are: 

D.B. Munro and T.W Allen (edd.), Homeri Opera. Tomus I. Iliadis Libros I-XII continens. Editio Tertia (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1920 –often reprinted], D.B. Munro and T.W Allen (edd.), Homeri Opera. Tomus II. Iliadis Libros XIII-XXIV continens. Editio Tertia (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1920 –often reprinted]

T.W Allen (ed.), Homeri Opera. Tomus III. Odysseae Libros I-XII continens. Editio Altera (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1917 –often reprinted], T.W Allen (ed.), Homeri Opera. Tomus IV. Odysseae Libros XIII-XXIV continens. Editio Altera (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1917 –often reprinted]

Vocabularies will also be provided.

These are the recommended commentaries:

S. Pulleyn, Homer: Iliad 1. Edited with introduction, translation and commentary (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2001]). G.S. Kirk, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume I: books 1-4 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1985]).

B. Graziosi and J. Haubold, Homer: Iliad Book VI (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2010]),

G.S. Kirk, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume II: books 5-8 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1990]).

C.W. Macleod, Homer: Iliad Book XXIV (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1982]),

N. Richardson, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume VI: books 21-24 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1993]).

A.F. Garvie, Homer: Odyssey Books VI-VIII (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1994]),

A. Heubeck , S. West , J. B. Hainsworth , A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Volume I: Introduction and Books I-VIII (Oxford University Press, Revised ed. [Oxford 1990])

The following annotated editions provide more basic help with vocabulary, morphology and syntax: P.A Draper, Homer. Iliad Book 1 with notes and vocabulary (The University of Michigan Press [Ann Arbor 2002], J.A. Harrison and R.H Jordan, Homer. Iliad I, with introduction, notes and vocabulary (Bristol Classical Press [London 2005]), J.A. Harrison and R.H Jordan, Homer. Iliad VI, with introduction, notes and vocabulary (Bristol Classical Press [London 1991])

 

Paper 2: Alternative Greek Language and Texts

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : HOMER, Iliad 1, 6, 24 and Odyssey  6 and 8

MR F G G BASSO
DR R S OMITOWOJU
ANO
(14C: Easter weeks 1-7)

The minimal aim for these classes will be to read at least one book  from among those prescribed and a portion of another, but some classes may be able to complete the reading of both. 

The editions of the Greek text that will be used in class (a copy will be provided) are: 

D.B. Munro and T.W Allen (edd.), Homeri Opera. Tomus I. Iliadis Libros I-XII continens. Editio Tertia (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1920 –often reprinted], D.B. Munro and T.W Allen (edd.), Homeri Opera. Tomus II. Iliadis Libros XIII-XXIV continens. Editio Tertia (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1920 –often reprinted]

T.W Allen (ed.), Homeri Opera. Tomus III. Odysseae Libros I-XII continens. Editio Altera (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1917 –often reprinted], T.W Allen (ed.), Homeri Opera. Tomus IV. Odysseae Libros XIII-XXIV continens. Editio Altera (Oxford University Press [Oxford 1917 –often reprinted]

Vocabularies will also be provided.

These are the recommended commentaries:

S. Pulleyn, Homer: Iliad 1. Edited with introduction, translation and commentary (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2001]). G.S. Kirk, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume I: books 1-4 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1985]).

B. Graziosi and J. Haubold, Homer: Iliad Book VI (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2010]),

G.S. Kirk, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume II: books 5-8 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1990]).

C.W. Macleod, Homer: Iliad Book XXIV (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1982]),

N. Richardson, The Iliad: A Commentary. Volume VI: books 21-24 (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1993]).

A.F. Garvie, Homer: Odyssey Books VI-VIII (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1994]),

A. Heubeck , S. West , J. B. Hainsworth , A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Volume I: Introduction and Books I-VIII (Oxford University Press, Revised ed. [Oxford 1990])

The following annotated editions provide more basic help with vocabulary, morphology and syntax: P.A Draper, Homer. Iliad Book 1 with notes and vocabulary (The University of Michigan Press [Ann Arbor 2002], J.A. Harrison and R.H Jordan, Homer. Iliad I, with introduction, notes and vocabulary (Bristol Classical Press [London 2005]), J.A. Harrison and R.H Jordan, Homer. Iliad VI, with introduction, notes and vocabulary (Bristol Classical Press [London 1991])

 following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: J.L.Marr and P.J. Rhodes, The ‘Old Oligarch’. The Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Xenophon (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts [Oxford 2008]).

The recommended commentary is the one by Marr-Rhodes. A shorter introduction and notes can be found in: V.J. Gray, Xenophon on Government (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2007]), 97-105, 187-210. Some basic help with morphology and syntax is provided by: M. Joyal, Xenophon’s Constitution of the Athenians (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 2001).

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : PLATO, Ion

MR F G G BASSO
DR R S OMITOWOJU
ANO
(7C: Easter weeks 1-7)

The edition of the Greek text that will be used in class (a copy will be provided) is the one found in: P. Murray, Plato on Poetry (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1996]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is the one by Murray. More basic help with morphology and syntax can be found in: A.M. Miller, Plato’s  Ion (Bryn Mawr Commentaries, 2nd  edition 1984). The fullest commentary is: Albert Rijksbaron, Plato. Ion. Or: On the Iliad (Brill [Leiden-Boston 2007]).

 

GRAMMAR REVISION AND CONSOLIDATION

DR C WEISS
(7C: Easter weeks 1-7)

These grammar classes will be devoted to focusing on a different grammatical topic each week according to a syllabus (these will follow 'sixteen topics of Ancient Greek grammar' on Moodle).

 

Courses for ALL candidates

In addition to courses on Greek and Latin epic (see below), there are two general courses on Greek and Latin literature, open to students studying for any part of the Tripos:

 

INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY THEORY

 DR I GILDENHARD
(4 LECTURES)

After an introductory lecture devoted to ‘theorizing theory’, we will spend the following three sessions visiting the major ‘sites of meaning’ in literary and cultural studies: the reader, the text, the author and the context. We’ll look at the theoretical inflections these variables have attracted, from antiquity to the present, with some illustrative examples from contemporary classical scholarship. The final lecture will place recent developments in theory in relation to the history of (classical) philology and the modern knowledge industry. The overall aim of these lectures is threefold: (a) to stimulate critical engagement with the basic categories on which we all rely in making sense of texts (and culture more generally); (b) to provide a first mapping of theoretical positions; and (c) to facilitate independent study of a domain of thought and practice that can seem daunting or even off-putting, but is fundamental to everything we do. All are welcome, especially the curious novice. Those wishing to get into the spirit beforehand could do worse than sample Jonathan Culler’s eminently readable Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2011).

 

GREEK AND LATIN METRE

DR D J BUTTERFIELD
(10 LECTURES)

Discussion of all the main Greek and Latin metres. These metres will be examined roughly in ascending order of difficulty or unfamiliarity, beginning with the dactylic hexameter and elegiacs, passing through the iambic trimeter and Roman comic metres, and ending with more complex lyric metres in Greek and Latin. Copies of passages discussed, and optional practice passages, will be provided. The earlier lectures, in particular, are recommended for undergraduates. Graduate students are also invited to attend, and they may find the later lectures, which will acquaint them with the less familiar metres, beneficial.

 

Greek and Latin Literature: the epic and other modules

Greek and Latin literature both have their roots in epic poetry, in large-scale tales of mythical events, particularly the interaction between gods and men. Such foundational texts form the spine of both the Greek and Roman literary traditions: not only were they read and reread throughout successive generations but they inspired and influenced new epic poems, which in turn helped shape their successors in the genre. In Easter Term of Part 1A undergraduates will begin reading elements of the most important Greek and Roman epic texts: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

For their Part IB studies, every candidate for Paper 5 must take the Greek Epic module, and every candidate for Paper 6 must take the Roman Epic module. All texts are to be read in Greek or Latin; a reduced specification is read by intensive-language candidates. Since these texts form a central part of Papers 5 and 6, lectures for the two epic modules begin in Easter Term and are continued into Michaelmas Term of IB.

Alongside the compulsory epic modules, each undergraduate must read two modules of their choice in both Greek and Latin literature. These modules, which are lectured on in the Michaelmas or Lent Terms of IB, are focused on a particular author, period or theme. Each module contains ‘Schedule A’ and ‘Schedule B’ texts: Schedule A texts are to be read in Greek or Latin and form the core texts of the module; Schedule B texts are to be read in English and provide further context and depth to the Schedule A texts. Non-intensive-language candidates for Papers 5 and 6 will be required to have read all of the Schedule A texts in Greek and Latin. Intensive-language candidates for Papers 5 and 6 will be required to have read a reduced specification of texts from the same module, with the remaining texts to be read in English.

 

Paper 5: Greek Literature

GREEK EPIC (COMPULSORY MODULE)

PROF. S D GOLDHILL
DR R LÄMMLE
(10 LECTURES)

This module is designed as an introduction to early Greek epic in its Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean milieu, with a focus on the Iliad. General introductory lectures will cover various issues of Homeric diction and language, the structure of the text, the history of scholarship, notably the ‘Homeric Question’ and debates concerning oral literature, heroic values, Homeric theology, and the place of the Iliad in the larger context of Archaic hexameter poetry. Following these more thematic lectures, close readings of the individual Schedule A (to be read in Greek) and B (to be read in English) texts will then span over both Easter and Michaelmas terms. The summer should be used fully by students to prepare and revise the texts. Note that Schedule B texts are an integral part of the module.

Please read as much of the set texts in advance as possible.  (Schedule A in Greek, Schedule B in English). Full bibliography will be distributed in lectures.

For the Iliad, use Allen and Monro’s Oxford Classical Text. For Books 6 and 8 of the Odyssey use Garvie’s CUP edition of books 6–8. Brief commentary of the Iliad in Willcock’s 2-vol. edition (Bristol Classical Press); fuller commentary in Kirk et al.'s 6-vol. edition (Cambridge University Press). Full commentary of the Odyssey in Heubeck et al.'s 3-vol. edition (Oxford University Press). There are separate commentaries on Book 1 of the Iliad (S. Pulleyn, Oxford 2000), Book 6 (B. Graziosi and J. Haubold, Cambridge 2010), Book 9 (J. Griffin, Oxford 1995), Book 22 (I. de Jong, Cambridge 2012), Book 24 (C. Macleod, Cambridge 1982). Further bibliography and advice on Schedule B and bibliography will be given during the lectures.

 

Schedule A:

  • Non-IG: Homer Iliad 1, 6, 9, 22, 24; Odyssey 6, 8.
  • IG: Homer Iliad 1, 6, 24; Odyssey 6, 8.

Schedule B: Remainder of both the Iliad and the Odyssey; Gilgamesh (Penguin 2003); Hesiod, Theogony and Works and Days; Epic Fragments (West Loeb 497); Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite; Homeric Hymn to Apollo; Plato, Ion.

 

Paper 6: Latin Literature

ROMAN EPIC (COMPULSORY MODULE)

DR D BUTTERFIELD
DR S CHOMSE
DR E GOWERS
DR D JOLOWICZ
DR C L WHITTON
(12 LECTURES)

This course studies Roman epic from Ennius to Statius (and beyond), tracing how six authors negotiate the great themes of love and heroism, myth and modernity, Greek and Roman, and the epic canon itself. The Schedule A texts are three of the most celebrated and influential poems in the western tradition: Catullus’ remarkable epyllion on Peleus and Thetis / the abandoned Ariadne; the framing books of Virgil’s Aeneid; and the central book of Ovid’s revolutionary Metamorphoses, with its tales (among others) of Scylla, Meleager and the autophagous Erysichthon. The lectures will consider these three texts in turn and set them, with particular reference to the Schedule B texts, in the longer durée of the epic tradition.

Please read as much of the set texts in advance as possible (Schedule A in Latin, Schedule B in English). Full bibliography will be distributed in lectures.

 

Schedule A: Catullus 64, Virgil Aeneid 1 and 12, Ovid Metamorphoses 8.

IL Schedule A: Catullus 64, Virgil Aeneid 1, Ovid Metamorphoses 8 (with Aeneid 12 to be read in English).

Schedule B: Ennius Annals fragments 1–163 Warmington, Lucan Civil war 1, Statius Thebaid 12.

Recommended editions of Schedule A texts (all with commentary): J. Godwin, Catullus poems 61–68 (Warminster 1995), R. G. Austin, P. Vergili Maronis Aeneidos liber primus (Oxford 1971), R. J. Tarrant, Virgil Aeneid Book XII (Cambridge 2012). For Schedule B texts use the Loebs of E. H. Warmington, Remains of old Latin. I Ennius and Caecilius (1935), J. D. Duff, Lucan. The civil war (1928), D. R. Shackleton Bailey Statius Thebaid 8–12 and Achilleid (2003).

 

Paper 7: Ancient History

THE EARLY HISTORY OF ROME AND GREECE

PROF. R G OSBORNE
ANO
(12 L: Easter, weeks 1-6)

Although conventionally we tell the story of Greek and Roman history as if Rome had no history before it became embroiled in Greek affairs at the end of the third century, in fact the early history of Rome and the early history of Greece are contemporary. Not only that but writing early Greek history and writing early Roman history poses very similar problems – in both cases we have strong later traditions that relate only speculatively to the evidence surviving from the period. In this course we look at what we can know from contemporary evidence, both literary and archaeological, about what was happening in Greece and at Rome from the eighth century to the end of the sixth century, and at what later tradition claimed and why it made such claims. The course exploits both the evidence of Greek and Roman epic that is being studied in the literary papers and a range of other poetry and prose and just a little archaeology. It serves as a background not only, in different ways, to Greek and Roman epic poetry but also to the constructions of the past in classical Greek and late Republican and Augustan Roman literature. The twelve lectures will be:

  1. Rome’s foundation stories: Aeneas, Romulus, Remus, and all that
  2. Digging up the birth of Rome: archaeology and the early history of Rome
  3. The epic history of the Greek city-state 1: the politics of Iliad and Odyssey
  4. The epic history of the Greek city-state 2: the gift of mobility
  5. Creating the just city: Hesiod’s Works and Days
  6. Rome enters a literate world: Demaratos and co.
  7. Creating the just Greek city: law-givers and tyranny
  8. Kings and tyrants at Rome
  9. Sex and the city: Archilochos, Semonides, Alkman and Sappho
  10. The Greek city state becomes rational: from Cleisthenes of Sicyon to Cleisthenes of Athens
  11. The invention of the Roman republic (i.e. how the stories of the early republic are tied into the aristocratic rivalries/history writing of the later Republic)
  12. Patricians, plebeians and the history of the class struggle

Preliminary reading: R. Osborne Greece in the Making c.1200–479 (2nd edn. London 2009); T. J. Cornell The Beginnings of Rome: Italy and Rome from the Bronze Age to the Punic Wars (London, 1995).

Passages for comment in the examination will be drawn from the following texts, but candidates will also be expected to use knowledge drawn from the texts set for the epic module of the literature papers.

Iliad 2.211–277 (Thersites), 18.478–608 (shield of Achilles)

Odyssey 2.1–223 (assembly on Ithaca); 4.589–620 (Menelaus’ gifts to Telemachus); 24. 412–66 (assembly on Ithaca).

Hesiod Works and Days 27–41, 225–47, 618–62 (trans. Most, Loeb)

Archilochos 196a (Cologne epode; trans. Gerber, Loeb)

Semonides 7 (trans. Gerber, Loeb)

Sappho 22, 23, 27, 98 (trans. Campbell, Loeb); New brothers poem, trans. Obbink ZPE 189 (2014) 39–40.

Alkman frg. 1 (Louvre Partheneion) trans. Campbell, Loeb)

Herodotos 5.66–9 (Cleisthenes and Cleisthenes of Sicyon); 5.92 (Cypselos and Periander) (trans. Godley, Loeb).

Meiggs and Lewis Greek Historical Inscriptions no.s 2 (Dreros), 5 (Cyrene), 8 (Chios) (trans. Fornara Translated Documents of Greece and Rome Vol. 1 From Archaic times to the end of the Peloponnesian War no.s 11, 18, 19).

Cicero De Republica II. 17-22; 25-30; 32-37.

Dionysius of Halicarnassus 3.46 – 3.49.1

Livy I.1-7.3; I.56-60; II.28-29,  31.7-33.3, 41; III.30-34; III.50-54; IV. 13-16; 20

Vergil Aeneid VI. 756-853; VIII.313-369

Ovid Met. XIV.581-622 & 772-851

Plutarch Life of Romulus 1-13

 

Paper 8: Greek and Roman Philosophy

EARLY GREEK PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE

PROF. G BETEGH
(8 LECTURES)

The course will discuss the relationship between science and philosophy from Thales to Plato’s Timaeus, based on the relevant fragments of the Presocratic philosophers and sections from Hippocratic treatises. The primary questions will be the following:

Science and natural philosophy: what is the difference and what difference does it make? What were the basic phenomena and explananda in cosmology, astronomy, and medicine? What was the role of observation? Topics considered will include

‘Building models: theoretical models and methods of visualisation’, ‘The methods of the early Greek mathematicians’, ‘The early Pythagoreans: lore and/or science’, ‘The ancient feud between doctors and philosophers’, and ‘Plato’s reaction to early Greek science in the Timaeus’.

Advance reading: G.E.R. Lloyd, Early Greek Science: Thales to Aristotle; R. McKirahan, Philosophy Before Socrates (2nd edition); A.A. Long (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Early Greek Philosophy.

 

Paper 9: Classical Art and Archaeology

THINKING WITH OBJECTS IN CLASSICAL ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY

DR T D’ANGELO
DR N J SPIVEY
(8 LECTURES and 3 CLASSES)

Ancient objects have the potential to tell us many stories, which begin from the moment of their creation and continue to their modern rediscovery. By looking carefully at an individual object or a group of objects, examining their archaeological contexts, materials, manufacturing techniques, styles and iconography, we can reconstruct how and for whom they were made, explain their functions, audience and users (including their modern reception) and also better understand the culture and society that produced and consumed them.

Expanding from the general 1A introduction to Greek and Roman art and archaeology, this course aims to provide students with a set of archaeological and art historical skills which will enable them to ‘read’ and make use of ancient objects in future research, recognizing the extent as well as limitations of the information they can provide. Each lecture focuses on an object or group of objects, ranging from Greek figurines to Roman paintings.

Three handling classes (on the history of collections, coins and casts), in the Faculty and the Fitzwilliam Museum, will encourage you to think further with objects in Classical art and archaeology.

Preliminary reading: C. Gosden and Y. Marshall, ‘The Cultural Biography of Objects’, World Archaeology 31 (1999), 169-178; S. Alcock and R. Osborne, Classical Archaeology (Oxford, 2012, 2nd ed.); R. Osborne, Archaic and Classical Greek Art (Oxford, 1998); J. Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (Princeton, 2007).

 

Paper 10: Classical and Comparative Philology and Linguistics

GREEK AND LATIN THROUGH THE AGES

PROF. J P T CLACKSON
(4 LECTURES)

The schedule of texts read in IA is largely concentrated around two historical periods and places: fifth-century Athens and Rome in the Age of Augustus. As an introduction to the Part IB course in Philology and Linguistics, these four lectures will present an outline of chronological and spatial range of Latin and Greek. The questions asked and answered will include the following. How do linguists divide Latin and Greek into different periods? Can a text be dated on linguistic grounds alone? When did Greek and Latin stop being spoken? Relevant reading includes: E.J. Bakker (ed.), A Companion to the Ancient Greek Language (Blackwell, 2010); J. Clackson (ed.), A Companion to the Latin Language (Blackwell, 2011).

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