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Papers 11-12: Greek and Latin Composition

Aims and objectives

  1. To develop students’ understanding of the structure and functioning of the Greek and Latin languages.
  2. To further students’ command of Greek and Latin vocabulary.
  3. To encourage in students an appreciation of different Greek and Latin prose and/or verse styles.
  4. To give students the opportunity to enjoy writing Greek and Latin themselves.

 

Scope and structure of the examination papers 2016–17

Paper 11. Translation from English into Greek prose and verse

This paper will be divided into three sections. Candidates will be required to attempt one Section only. Candidates for Paper 1 may attempt either Section (a) or Section (c). Candidates for Paper 2 may attempt any one of the three Sections. Credit will be given for knowledge of the general principles of Greek accentuation.

Section (a) contains five passages of English for translation into Greek (candidates should attempt only one):

  1. a 'freestyle' prose passage from any prose author
  2. a passage of law-court oratory from Lysias
  3. a philosophical dialogue (i.e. a 'question-and-answer' passage) from Plato
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek iambics
  5. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek elegiacs

Section (b) contains one passage of English prose based on one of the writers prescribed for unseen translation for Section A of Paper 2, for translation into Greek prose.

Section (c) contains five passages of English for translation into Greek, each approximately half the length of those set in Section (a). Candidates should attempt two passages, at least one of which should be verse.

  1. a 'freestyle' prose passage from any prose author
  2. a passage of law-court oratory from Lysias
  3. a philosophical dialogue (i.e. a 'question-and-answer' passage) from Plato
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek iambics
  5. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek elegiacs

 

Paper 12. Translation from English into Latin prose and verse

This paper will be divided into three sections. Candidates will be required to attempt one Section only. Candidates for Paper 1 may attempt either Section (a) or Section (c). Candidates for Paper 2 may attempt any one of the three Sections.

Section (a) contains five passages of English for translation into Latin (candidates should attempt only one):

  1. a 'freestyle' prose passage from any prose author
  2. a passage of oratory from Cicero
  3. a passage of narrative from Livy
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin hexameters
  5. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin elegiacs

Section (b) contains one passage of English prose based on one of the writers prescribed for unseen translation for Section A of Paper 4, for translation into Latin prose.

Section (c) contains five passages of English for translation into Latin, each approximately half the length of those set in Section (a). Candidates should attempt two passages, at least one of which should be verse.

  1. a 'freestyle' prose passage from any prose author
  2. a passage of oratory from Cicero
  3. a passage of narrative from Livy
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin hexameters
  5. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin elegiacs

 

Course description

Most of the teaching for these papers is provided through college supervisions. However, the Faculty offers the following course:

 

WRITING GREEK AND LATIN

DR C WEISS
(20 C: Michaelmas, Lent and Easter)

Prose composition is a valuable tool for learning Greek and Latin: it reinforces our knowledge of the languages and gives us a chance to be creative with them! This course is designed for complete beginners but those who would like to improve their skills are also welcome. Lectures are presented in the form of an informal workshop (though no preparation or participation is required) and normally alternate between Greek and Latin. In Michaelmas we concentrate on the trickier subordinate clauses and idioms, in Lent we attempt to imitate particular authors and genres, and in Easter we revise and attempt contemporary pieces. Those interested in verse composition will find this course useful but they should also contact their Director of Studies. Those taking Paper 11 will be aided by the course on Greek Accents.

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