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Impact of Ancient Cities

last modified Mar 14, 2017 03:24 PM
The Faculty is very pleased to announce that the European Research Council has awarded an Advanced Research Grant to Professor Andrew Wallace-Hadrill for a 5 year project on the Impact of Ancient Cities.

Cities were among the defining features of the ancient world, and urbanism is one of the principal legacies of antiquity. But which were the features of the ancient city that survived, how were they modified and transformed in different contexts at different periods? The aim of the project is to look at the impact of the ancient city, whether though its physical fabric or its ideals and structures, across time and across the Mediterranean, in both the Christian and Islamic worlds.

Archaeology tends to privilege the ancient cities that failed to survive, like Pompeii or Ostia, Timgad or Palmyra. This project will focus on the survivors, cities with enduring resilience from Alexandria to Zaragoza, and especially those with complex cultural histories, like Cordoba or Thessalonike, and those with enduring cultural influence, above all Rome and Istanbul.

The project team will consist of 5 researchers: 4 postdocs and one PhD student, plus a Research Assistant, led by Andrew Wallace-Hadrill (PI) and Elizabeth Key Fowden. While based in the Classics Faculty, it will promote links with other Faculties, notably Asian and Middle Eastern Studies and History, and will involve fieldwork across the Mediterranean. The project will last for 5 years, starting on 1 October 2016, and is wholly financed by an Advanced Research Grant from the European Research Council.

 

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This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 693418).

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