skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Papers 1-4: Greek and Latin Language and Texts

Aims and objectives

  1. To offer students help in reading a variety of types of Greek and Latin, and to develop their knowledge, abilities and skills towards the independent reading of authors of whom they have prior experience.
  2. To enhance students’ understanding of the structure and functioning of the Greek and Latin languages.
  3. To further students’ command of Greek and Latin vocabulary.
  4. To further students’ ability to write perceptively about passages that they study
  5. To offer guidance in the reading of texts in connection with students’ work for Papers 5 and 6.

 

Schedules of texts

Learning and teaching are organised around the following schedules of texts (the Target Texts). For Michaelmas 2018 and Lent 2019 these are:

  • For candidates taking Paper 1:
  • Michaelmas: Lysias 1; Ps.-Xenophon, Athenaion Politeia; Plato, Crito;
  • Lent: Herodotus 1.1–94; Euripides Medea (the choral odes will not form part of the body of text relevant for examination).
  • For candidates taking Paper 2 (Intensive Greek):
  • Michaelmas: Lysias 1; Ps.-Xenophon, Athenaion Politeia 1–2; Plato, Crito 50a5–end;
  • Lent: Herodotus 1. 29–46; Euripides, Medea (the choral odes will not form part of the body of text relevant for examination).
  • For candidates taking Paper 3:
  • Michaelmas: Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1; Cicero, Pro Caelio; Augustus, Res Gestae (to be studied with its Greek translation);
  • Lent: Sallust, Catiline; Lucretius 3.830–1094, 4.1037–1287.
  • For candidates taking Paper 4 (Intensive Latin):
  • Michaelmas: Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1; Augustus, Res Gestae (to be studied with its Greek translation);
  • Lent: Sallust, Catiline; Lucretius 3.830–1094.


Scope and structure of the examination papers 2018–19

Paper 1: the paper will last for three hours and will consist of three questions. Q. 1 will be a passage of Greek prose, previously unseen, for translation into English. Q. 2 will be a passage of Greek verse, previously unseen, for translation into English. These passages will be selected from the works of authors studied at Part 1A (i.e. Lysias, Herodotus, Plato and Euripides) or Xenophon. Q. 3 will offer two passages from the schedule of texts prescribed by the Faculty Board for study at Part 1A, of which one must be chosen for critical discussion.

Paper 2: the paper will last for three hours and will consist of three questions. Q. 1 will be a passage of Greek prose, previously unseen, for translation into English. Q. 2 will be a passage of Greek verse, previously unseen, for translation into English. These passages will be selected from either works by the authors studied at Part 1A (i.e. Lysias, Herodotus, Plato and Euripides) or Xenophon. Q. 3 will offer two passages from the schedule of texts prescribed by the Faculty Board for study at Part 1A, of which one must be chosen for critical discussion. Paper 2 is intended for candidates who had little or no knowledge of Greek before entry to the University.

Paper 3: the paper will last for three hours and will consist of three questions. Q. 1 will be a passage of Latin prose, previously unseen, for translation into English. Q. 2 will be a passage of Latin verse, previously unseen, for translation into English. These passages will be selected from the works of authors studied at Part 1A (i.e. Ovid, Cicero, Augustus, Lucretius, and Sallust). Q. 3 will offer two passages from the schedule of texts prescribed by the Faculty Board for study at Part 1A, of which one must be chosen for critical discussion. (If a passage from Augustus, Res Gestae is chosen, it will be presented with its Greek translation.)

Paper 4: the paper will last for three hours and will consist of three questions. Q. 1 will be a passage of Latin prose, previously unseen, for translation into English. Q. 2 will be a passage of Latin verse, previously unseen, for translation into English. These passages will be selected from the works of authors studied at Part 1A (i.e.Ovid, Augustus, Lucretius, and Sallust). Q. 3 will offer two passages from the schedule of texts prescribed by the Faculty Board for study at Part 1A, of which one must be chosen for critical discussion. (If a passage from Augustus, Res Gestae is chosen, it will be presented with its Greek translation.) Paper 4 is intended for candidates who had little or no knowledge of Latin before coming up and who have not previously taken the Preliminary Examination to Part Ia.

 

Courses for ALL candidates

GREEK TEXTS

COURSE DIRECTOR:
DR L PRAUSCELLO
(8 L: Michaelmas; 8 L: Lent)

This course is designed to support undergraduates in their reading of texts for Part 1A. Its emphasis is multidisciplinary: that is, texts are looked at from a multiplicity of perspectives—literary, linguistic, historical, and sometimes archaeological and philosophical. The texts are studied both because of their own intrinsic interest and as providing a window into many diverse aspects of the ancient world which interest modern scholars.

 

Michaelmas Term

Texts studied: Lysias 1 (recommended edn.: C. Carey (ed.), Lysiae Orationes cum Fragmentis (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  2007]); Pseudo-Xenophon, Athenaion Politeia (recommended edn.: J.L. Marr and P.J. Rhodes, The ‘Old Oligarch’. The Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Xenophon (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts [Oxford 2008]); Plato Crito (recommended edn.: E.A. Duke, W.F. Hicken, W.S.M. Nicoll, D.B. Robinson, J.C.G. Strachan (edd.), Platonis Opera, tomus I (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  1995]).

  • October 4 Lysias: rhetoric in society and as literature (PROF. T WHITMARSH)
  • October 11 Lysias: men and women in Athens: the legal case (DR P MILLETT)
  • October 18 Lysias: the Greek house: the material evidence (DR S OWEN)
  • October 25 Athenaion Politeia: the beginnings of Greek political thought (PROF. P CARTLEDGE)
  • November 1 Athenaion Politeia: problems of interpretation (MR F BASSO)
  • November 8 Crito: why was Socrates put to death? (DR P MILLETT)
  • November 15 Crito: philosophical questions (DR M HATZIMICHALI)
  • November 22 Crito: the Platonic dialogue as a literary form (PROF. T WHITMARSH)

 

Lent Term

Texts studied: Herodotus 1.1–94 (recommended edn.: N.G. Wilson (ed.), Herodoti Historiae: Libri I-IV (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford 2015]); Euripides Medea (recommended edn.: Mastronarde, D. Euripides, Medea. Cambridge, 2002).

  • January 18 Herodotus: the father of history? (MR F BASSO)
  • January 25 Herodotus 1: the logos of Croesus  (MR F BASSO)
  • February 1 Herodotus: the world seen from Halikarnassos (DR H WILLEY)
  • February 8 Herodotus 1: Herodotus’ Ionic Greek (DR L TAGLIAPIETRA)
  • February 15 Medea: Greek dramatic festivals and Euripidean drama (PROF. T WHITMARSH)
  • February 22 Medea: reading the play (i) (DR R LAEMMLE)
  • March 1 Medea: reading the play (ii) (DR R LAEMMLE)
  • March 8 Medea: poetic language in Medea (DR T MEISSNER)


LATIN TEXTS

COURSE DIRECTOR:
DR L PRAUSCELLO
(8 L: Michaelmas; 8 L: Lent)

This course is designed to support undergraduates in their reading of texts for Part 1A. Its emphasis is multidisciplinary: that is, texts are looked at from a multiplicity of perspectives—literary, linguistic, historical, and sometimes archaeological and philosophical. The texts are studied both because of their own intrinsic interest and as providing a window into many diverse aspects of the ancient world which interest modern scholars.

 

Michaelmas Term

Texts to be studied: Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1 (recommended edn.: Hollis, A. Ars Amatoria Book 1. Oxford 1977); Cicero, Pro Caelio (recommended edn.: Dyck, A. Cicero, Pro Marco Caelio. Cambridge, 2012); Augustus, Res Gestae (also to be read in Greek) (recommended edn.: Cooley, A. Res Gestae Divi Augusti: Text, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge, 2009).

  • October 9  Ars 1: When didactic meets elegy (DR C SCHEIDEGGER)
  • October 16 Ars 1: Urban myth (DR C SCHEIDEGGER)
  • October 23 Ars 1: The poet and the princeps (DR C SCHEIDEGGER)
  • October 30 Ars 1: Roman history and monuments in Ars 1 (DR N SPIVEY)
  • November 6 Pro Caelio: Women and politics in the Pro Caelio (DR R FLEMMING)
  • November 13 Pro Caelio: the case against Caelius (DR D BUTTERFIELD)
  • November 20 Pro Caelio: the language of Cicero (DR D BUTTERFIELD)
  • November 27 Res Gestae: epigraphy from the Res Gestae (DR J PATTERSON)

 

Lent Term

Texts to be studied: Augustus, Res Gestae (also to be read in Greek); Sallust, Catiline (recommended edn.: J. Ramsey ed. Sallust's Bellum Catilinae. 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007); Lucretius 3. 830–1094 (recommended edn.: J. Ramsey ed. Kenney, E. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura Book 3 2nd edition 2014), 4. 1037–1287 (recommended edn.: Smith, M. and Rouse, W.H.D. Lucretius, De Rerum Natura Cambridge, Mass. 1982 (Loeb)).

  • January 17 Res Gestae: how Augustus describes himself (DR R FLEMMING)
  • January 24 Res Gestae: a bilingual text (PROF. J CLACKSON)
  • January 31 Sallust, Catiline (PROF. S OAKLEY)
  • February 7 Sallust, Catiline (PROF. S OAKLEY)
  • February 14 Sallust, Catiline (DR  J PATTERSON)
  • February 21 Lucretius: Lucretius and Epicurus on death (PROF. J WARREN)
  • February 28 Lucretius: Lucretius and didactic poetry (DR D BUTTERFIELD)
  • March 7 Lucretius: Lucretius and Epicurus on love (PROF. J WARREN)


ADVANCED GREEK SYNTAX (NON-IG)

MR F BASSO
(8 L: Michaelmas)

In this course we will cover the essential topics of Greek syntax, primarily using examples drawn from your target texts. The aim is to consolidate and deepen your knowledge by seeing how Greek grammar works in practice. In each topic we will start with the basics and progress to more advanced issues, so these lectures will be of use to students of all levels of experience. As a reference grammar we recommend Smyth and Messing, Greek Grammar (1956). All Part IA non-IG students are strongly encouraged to attend.

 

ADVANCED LATIN SYNTAX

PROF. S OAKLEY
(6 L:  Michaelmas)

How does your knowledge of the Latin language keep pace with your broadening literary horizons and developing literary-critical skills? This course will consolidate and extend your understanding of essential Latin syntax, covering key constructions and ideas and introducing less familiar topics such as speech particles. Examples will be taken primarily from Part IA target texts, and lectures will cater to both the least and the most experienced students. For the least experience the ‘rules’ will be explained. For them ore experience we shall try to explain why the ‘rules’ became ‘rules’. No initial reading is required but, if you want to understand syntax and not just learn ‘the rules’, E. C. Woodcock, A New Latin Syntax (1959, but often reprinted), is an excellent place to start. All Part IA students are strongly advised to attend.

 

GREEK ACCENTS

DR N HOPKINSON
(4 L: Michaelmas)

Two lectures, explaining the general principles of Greek accentuation, followed by two practical classes. Handouts will be provided.

 

CRITICAL DISCUSSION OF GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE

DR A KACHUK
(4 L: Lent)

How to ‘discuss critically’ the literary aspects of passages from ancient texts. Examples and hands-on practice drawn from Part IA texts. Photocopies supplied.

 

Paper 1: Greek Language and Texts

READING CLASSES: LYSIAS 1

ANO
(8 C: Michaelmas weeks 1-4)

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: C. Carey (ed.), Lysiae Orationes cum Fragmentis (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  2007]). Vocabularies and other language materials will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is: S. C. Todd, A Commentary on Lysias, Speeches 1-11 (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2007].  A shorter introduction and commentary can be found in: C. Carey, Lysia: Selected Speeches (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1989]).

Among annotated editions, M. Campbell, Lysias: On the Murder of Eratosthenes, A Greek Prose Reading Course for Post-Beginners (Bristol Classical Press [London 1998]) provides little help with interpretation but is specifically intended for language learning.

 

READING CLASSES: PS.-XENOPHON, The Constitution of the Athenians

MR F BASSO
(8 C: Michaelmas weeks 1-8)

In these classes (and in those on Herodotus 1 listed below) we will translate the text in its entirety and devote attention to its grammatical features but also discuss its interpretation throughout, in preparation for the ‘Critical Discussion’ question in Paper 1. 

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: J.L. Marr and P.J. Rhodes, The ‘Old Oligarch’. The Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Xenophon (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts [Oxford 2008]).

The recommended commentary is the one by Marr-Rhodes. A shorter introduction and notes can be found in: V.J. Gray, Xenophon on Government (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2007]), 97-105, 187-210. Some basic help with morphology and syntax is provided by: M. Joyal, Xenophon’s Constitution of the Athenians (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 2001).

 

READING CLASSES: PLATO, Crito

ANO
(8 C: Michaelmas weeks 5-8)

In these classes (and in those on Herodotus 1 listed below) we will translate the text. The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: E.A. Duke, W.F. Hicken, W.S.M. Nicoll, D.B. Robinson, J.C.G. Strachan (edd.), Platonis Opera, tomus I (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  1995]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentaries are: C. Emlyn-Jones, Plato: Crito (Bristol Classical Press [London 1999]) and J. Burnett, Plato: Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates and Crito (revised ed.  Oxford University Press [Oxford 1977]).

Among annotated editions, M. Campbell, Plato: Crito. A Greek Prose Reading Course for Post-Beginners (Bristol Classical Press [London 1998]]) provides little help with interpretation but is specifically intended for language learning.

 

READING CLASSES: HERODOTUS 1.1-94

MR F BASSO
(8 C: Lent weeks 1-8)

We will cover select passages, using the following edition of the Greek text (a copy of which will be provided): N.G. Wilson (ed.), Herodoti Historiae: Libri I-IV (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford 2015]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is: David Asheri, Alan Lloyd, and Aldo Corcella, A Commentary on Herodotus Books I-IV (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2007]). Some basic help with morphology and syntax is provided by: George A. Sheets, Herodotus,  Book 1  (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 1993). The edition with notes of J. H. Sleeman (Cambridge University Press 1909 [reprinted  Bristol Classical Press 2002]) also provides some help with the language.

 

READING CLASSES: EURIPIDES, Medea

ANO
(16C: Lent weeks 1-8)

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: D. Mastronarde Euripides, Medea (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2002]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is the one by Mastronarde and students are expected to bring their own copy to the class.  Some more basic help with morphology and syntax is provided in: M. Kwintner, Euripides Medea  (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 1999).

The choral odes will not form part of the body of text relevant for examination.

 

Paper 2: Alternative Greek Language and Texts

In most years the majority of students who read for the Classical Tripos have not studied Greek up to A-level standard and therefore take Paper 2. In the Michaelmas and Lent Terms the Faculty runs compulsory Intensive Greek Classes for those studying for Paper 2. The aim of these classes is twofold: first, to provide instruction in the Greek language through study of grammar, translation seen and unseen, and the reading of Greek texts; second, to help undergraduates in their reading of the texts prescribed for those taking Paper 2.

In Faculty teaching for this paper, undergraduates are divided into groups (normally seven or eight); these groups are roughly graded to reflect knowledge of the Greek language. The larger sub-set of these students - those who have not taken Ancient Greek to GCSE (normally all groups except the highest) - are required to study on a pre-terminal course, before the Michaelmas Term. If you are one of these students, you will be notified of what is expected of you before the Michaelmas Term in which you arrive in Cambridge.

It is important to note that undergraduates are often moved between groups as their attainment prior to arriving in Cambridge and their proficiency in the Greek language become clearer.

 

PRETERMINAL INTENSIVE GREEK CLASSES (for pre-GCSE candidates only)

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR C WEISS
DR C JACKSON
Tues 25th  Sept – Fri. 28th Sept 2018
(9 C: 3 per day)

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : LYSIAS 1

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR E GREENSMITH
16 C: Michaelmas weeks 1-4

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: C. Carey (ed.), Lysiae Orationes cum Fragmentis (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  2007]). Vocabularies and other language materials will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is: S. C. Todd, A Commentary on Lysias, Speeches 1-11 (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2007].  A shorter introduction and commentary can be found in: C. Carey, Lysias: Selected Speeches (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 1989]).

Among annotated editions, M. Campbell, Lysias: On the Murder of Eratosthenes, A Greek Prose Reading Course for Post-Beginners (Bristol Classical Press [London 1998]) provides little help with interpretation but is specifically intended for language learning.

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : PS.-XENOPHON, The Constitution of the Athenians, 1-2

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR E GREENSMITH
6 C: Michaelmas weeks 5-6

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: J.L.Marr and P.J. Rhodes, The ‘Old Oligarch’. The Constitution of the Athenians attributed to Xenophon (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts [Oxford 2008]).

The recommended commentary is the one by Marr-Rhodes. A shorter introduction and notes can be found in: V.J. Gray, Xenophon on Government (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2007]), 97-105, 187-210. Some basic help with morphology and syntax is provided by: M. Joyal, Xenophon’s Constitution of the Athenians (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 2001)

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : PLATO, Crito 50a5-end

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR E GREENSMITH
6 C: Michaelmas weeks 7-8

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: E.A. Duke, W.F. Hicken, W.S.M. Nicoll, D.B. Robinson, J.C.G. Strachan (edd.), Platonis Opera, tomus I (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford  1995]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentaries are: C. Emlyn-Jones, Plato: Crito (Bristol Classical Press [London 1999]) and J. Burnett, Plato: Euthyphro, Apology of Socrates and Crito (revised ed.  Oxford University Press [Oxford 1977]).

Among annotated editions, M. Campbell, Plato: Crito. A Greek Prose Reading Course for Post-Beginners (Bristol Classical Press [London 1998]]) provides little help with interpretation but is specifically intended for language learning.

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : HERODOTUS 1.29-46

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR E GREENSMITH
9 C, Lent:  Tues 16th + Weds 17th Jan 2019 and weeks 1-2

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: N.G. Wilson (ed.), Herodoti Historiae: Libri I-IV (Oxford Classical Texts [Oxford 2015]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is: David Asheri, Alan Lloyd, and Aldo Corcella, A Commentary on Herodotus Books I-IV (Oxford University Press [Oxford 2007]). Some basic help with morphology and syntax is provided by: George A. Sheets, Herodotus,  Book 1  (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 1993).

 

INTENSIVE GREEK READING CLASSES : EURIPIDES, Medea

MR F BASSO
DR R OMITOWOJU
DR E GREENSMITH
18 C: Lent weeks 3-8

The following edition of the Greek text will be used in class and a copy will be provided: D. Mastronarde (Cambridge University Press [Cambridge 2002]). Vocabularies will also be provided.

The recommended commentary is the one by Mastronarde and students are expected to bring their own copy to the class.  Some more basic help with morphology and syntax is provided in: M. Kwintner, Euripides Medea  (Bryn Mawr Commentaries 1999).

The choral odes will not form part of the body of text relevant for examination.

 

INTENSIVE GREEK: UNPREPARED TRANSLATION PRACTICE

MR F BASSO
16 C: Michaelmas and Lent weeks 1-8

These classes will focus on acquiring strategies for tackling passages of Ancient Greek (in prose and verse) of the kind that candidates can expect on the exam.

 

INTENSIVE GREEK: GRAMMAR CONSOLIDATION AND PRACTICE

DR C WEISS
16 C: Michaelmas and Lent weeks 1-8

These grammar classes will be devoted to focusing on a different grammatical topic each week according to a syllabus (these will follow 'sixteen topics of Ancient Greek grammar' on Moodle).

 

Paper 3: Latin Language and Texts

LATIN LANGUAGE CONSOLIDATION AND READING STRATEGIES

ANO
(12 C: Lent and Easter)

The course is designed for undergraduates wishing to reinforce their knowledge of grammar and develop strategies for reading set texts and translating unseen passages. For the first sessions we concentrate on essential constructions, and in the later ones we look at selected passages from a range of authors. It is by invitation: please consult your Director of Studies.

 

LATIN LANGUAGE AND READING FOR EX-PRELIMS STUDENTS

DR R OMITOWOJU ET AL
(32 C: Michaelmas and Lent weeks 1-8)

This course is designed to help Four-Year Degree candidates consolidate their Latin Grammar and have structured help with their 1A texts.

RSS Feed Latest news

Gildersleeve Prize 2017

Oct 11, 2018

The Faculty is delighted to report that the Gildersleeve Prize in 2017 has been presented to Dr Max Leventhal.

Second CREWS Conference: Call for Papers

Jun 27, 2018

We are pleased to announce the second CREWS conference, to take place Thursday 14th – Saturday 16th of March 2019. ‘Exploring the Social and Cultural Contexts of Historic Writing Systems’ aims to look at writing systems’ place in society and culture.

The Cambridge Philological Society Prize 2019 and 2020

Jun 27, 2018

The Cambridge Philological Society is pleased to announce the establishment of a prize for the best submitted article by a graduate student or early-career researcher.

Research Associate (Assistant Editor, Oxford History of the Archaic Greek World)

Jun 22, 2018

Details of how to apply for this one year fixed term post are now available online, Closing date 23 July 2018.

View all news