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Rhodes Pinto on Thales and Diogenes of Apollonia

Rhodes Pinto: God, Stuff, and Magnets: The Relation of the Divine to First Principles and Motion in Thales and Diogenes of Apollonia
When Apr 30, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where Room G.21
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cf. Part II papers B3 (God and Anti-God) and X1 Idols

In the lecture, I would examine in some detail (for their doctrines are not a settled matter) what Thales and Diogenes take god to be, and how each of their concepts of god are intricately involved in their explanation of the material first principle of the world and of the motion in it. Thales and Diogenes are temporally the first and last of the Presocratic philosophers, which I think makes them particularly helpful to examine in parallel (Diogenes has drawn sneers from many scholars for returning to a one element monism [air] such as Thales had [water], but the differences in explanation make it no mere return). In addition, a major yet very accessible way to try to come to grips with each of their positions (as well as how they diverge from each other) can be found in how they are reported to have explained the phenomenon of magnetic attraction(!).

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