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Transferable skills

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The Faculty of Classics, in consultation with Colleges, has identified the ways in which undergraduates can acquire and develop certain skills and attributes throughout their University career.  These skills, as well as enhancing academic performance, can be used beyond university, and are highly valued by employers.  You are encouraged to make use of the opportunities afforded to you to develop those attributes which will stand you in good stead in later life.

As a guide, the University and Colleges have agreed jointly that all undergraduates should graduate with intellectual skills; communication skills; organisational skills; and interpersonal skills.

It is also thought that, although not absolutely necessary for everyone, the following will also be useful: research skills, numeracy, computer literacy, and foreign language skills.

Below are examples of how skills might be developed by an undergraduate in Classics in each of these categories.  The list of possible activities is not exhaustive.

If you would like more advice about acquiring these kinds of skills, contact your Director of Studies or the Faculty Undergraduate Adviser.  The University skills website or your College website may also give useful information about the opportunities available.

 

INTELLECTUAL SKILLS

such as

  • Intellectual initiative
  • Critical reflection
  • The ability to gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information
  • The ability to extract key elements from complex information
  • The ability to identify and solve problems
  • The ability to select and apply appropriate methodologies
  • The ability to assess the meaning and significance of information
  • Analytical and evaluative thinking
  • Estimation of the relevance of information
  • Discriminating between opposing theories
  • Forming judgements on the basis of evidence
  • The ability to engage in lateral thinking, openness to creative thinking
  • The ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely
  • The ability to deal with a multi-disciplinary subject

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Preparing for and participation in lectures   
  • Preparing for and participation in  classes 
  • Preparing for and participation in supervisions       
  • Preparing for and participation in seminars
  • Preparing for and writing college and university examinations
  • Preparing for and participation in discussion groups
  • Preparing for and carrying out unseen translation exercises
  • Preparing for and carrying out composition or literary criticism exercises
  • Preparing for and carrying out source analysis
  • Preparing for and carrying out identification of art historical or archaeological objects

COMMUNICATION SKILLS

such as

  • The ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely
  • The ability to present material orally in a clear and effective way, including sensitivity to the listener’s perspective
  • The ability to present written material clearly and appropriately, in good English, including sensitivity to the listener’s perspective
  • Attention to detail

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Writing essays, reports, dissertations    
  • Participating in supervisions
  • Giving presentations on work done 
  • Study and translation of texts
  • Membership and Officership of committees, e.g. SSJC, College committees
  • JCR/MCR involvement
  • Negotiating use of Faculty and College facilities e.g. Computer Room, Common Room, meeting rooms
  • Membership and Officership of Faculty and College societies e.g. Herodoteans
  • Organising or participating in events such as introductory meetings or open days for new students

ORGANISATIONAL SKILLS

 such as

  • Self-direction
  • Self-discipline
  • The ability to write and think under pressure and to meet deadlines
  • Management of time and resources

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Organising one’s own work programme and particularly ensuring that supervision assignments, class assignments and theses are completed on time
  • Understanding the Tripos structure, Lecture List and timetable and being able to use the information; choice of Part II options
  • Organising and participating in field work
  • Applications for travel and other grants, including Prizes
  • Membership and Officership of committees, e.g. SSJC, JCR, MCR
  • Negotiating use of College and Faculty facilities e.g. Computer Room, Common Room, meeting rooms, equipment
  • Membership and Officership of societies e.g. Herodoteans, college societies
  • Organisation of events: entertainment, lectures, society events
  • Organising or participating in events such as introductory meetings and open days for new students

INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

such as

  • Working creatively, flexibly and adaptably with others
  • Formulating and meeting team objectives
  • Interacting successfully on a one-to-one basis

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Developing co-operative learning skills in supervisions and classes
  • Participating in class and seminar discussion
  • Membership and Officership of committees, e.g. SSJC
  • Interaction with a wide range of people, cultures, disciplines
  • Preparation of joint projects e.g. purchase of equipment, publicity for elections
  • Participation in college and university politics
  • Negotiating use of College and Faculty facilities e.g. Computer Room, Common Room
  • Membership and Officership of societies e.g. Herodoteans
  • Organising or participating in events such as introductory meeting for new students
  • Organising and managing out-of-college accommodation
  • Standing for election to membership of the Faculty Board, College committees and bodies e.g. JCR, MCR, Council, Governing Body
  • Acting as member of the Faculty Board, College committees and bodies e.g. JCR, MCR, Council, Governing Body
  • Participation in field work
  • Acting as a student mentor/friend
  • Management role in societies
  • Participation in sporting activities

RESEARCH SKILLS

such as

  • Bibliographic skills
  • Observational skills
  • Practical skills
  • Writing and presentation skills

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Use of college, Faculty and University libraries
  • Use of the UL and Faculty Library catalogues
  • Use of Faculty and college computing facilities
  • Use of electronic resources such as TLG, Perseus
  • Use of the Museum of Classical Archaeology
  • Visits to other Museums and institutions
  • Handling or observation of artefacts
  • Writing essays, reports, dissertations
  • Giving presentations on work done
  • Learning to decipher scripts (papyri, medieval manuscripts and inscriptions)
  • Field work

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE SKILLS

such as

  • Reading references in other languages
  • Corresponding with overseas scholars
  • Speaking/conversing in a modern foreign language
  • Writing in a modern foreign language

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Reading references in MFL given on reading lists
  • Language clubs and societies
  • CALL
  • Foreign field work
  • Use of the Language Centre
  • Opportunities to attend courses and take diplomas/certificates offered by the University
  • Conversation with others in the Faculty and College

COMPUTER LITERACY

such as

  • Use of word-processing
  • Use of spread-sheets and databases
  • Use of the internet and e-mail
  • Use of Computer Assisted Language Learning
  • Facility/aptitude for programming

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Use of College and Faculty computing facilities 
  • Use of College and Faculty web sites for gathering information on courses, events, deadlines, timetable
  • Using the internet for information-gathering e.g. visiting museum and library web-pages
  • Using e-mail for communication with other members of the College and University e.g. arranging supervisions
  • Use of the UL and Faculty and College Library catalogues
  • Use of electronic resources such as TLG, Perseus
  • Using mailing lists and news groups to post or gather information e.g. selling  or acquiring books
  • Involvement in financial activities of clubs, societies and committees (e.g. Herodoteans, SSJC)
  • Use of spread-sheets and databases for analysing questionnaire responses
  • Use of college on-line library catalogue and other on-line learning resources
  • Preparing dissertations, reports and essays
  • Analysis of data (e.g. archaeological, linguistic or historical)
  • Learning a modern language
  • Learning, translating, writing in and linguistic analysis of an ancient language

NUMERACY SKILLS

such as

  • Knowledge and use of statistical techniques
  • Basic financial transactions

may be developed through University and College activities such as

  • Analysis of data (e.g. archaeological, linguistic or historical)
  • Involvement in financial activities of clubs, societies and committees (e.g. Herodoteans, SSJC)
  • Use of spread-sheets for analysing questionnaire responses

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