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How we teach

How we teach is as important as what we teach. All students in Classics benefit from tuition which is organised centrally by the Faculty and, on a more individual basis, by the college. Colleges also provide you with a Director of Studies in Classics, who will help you maximise your potential. (You can find out who directs studies at a particular college here.)

This variety of provision allows us to offer a unique level of care and flexibility. Lectures are offered on all parts of the course as well as in some areas that cut across disciplines, while classes (especially in Part 2) allow you to debate issues and formulate your own arguments.

Likewise, throughout your degree course, college (or “supervision”) offers you the chance to study the ancient world in depth, often emphasising a different angle from the lectures. The format of supervisions varies with the supervisor. Most often, you will write an essay in advance and discuss it with your supervisor and one or two other students. There is a real opportunity to work on each individual’s intellectual development. Supervisions train you to think critically and independently.

In addition to lectures and seminars, the Classics Faculty houses the Museum of Classical Archaeology on its first floor. This contains one of the finest collections of casts of classical sculpture in the world. It also has an excellent pottery collection. These are regularly used in art and archaeology teaching. Moreover, students taking archaeology courses can sign up to visit or even help excavate a variety of sites, both in Britain and the Mediterranean.

The library downstairs completes the picture. Not only is it a wonderful resource for primary and secondary literature on open access, but it is comfortable, light and airy. Undergraduates, graduates and lecturing staff find it a friendly and productive place to work.

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Vacancy - Research Associate, ‘Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems’ Project (CREWS)

Oct 20, 2016

Applications are sought for a Research Associate who will be a member of the ‘Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems’ (CREWS) project, led by the Principal Investigator Dr Philippa Steele.

How to write a Greek Dictionary

Oct 06, 2016

Watch the film about the Faculty's Greek Lexicon Project, working towards a a new dictionary of Ancient Greek.

New Discovery

Sep 20, 2016

Professor Jack Davis and Dr Sharon Stocker (Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati), ‘Sometimes All That Glitters Is Gold: The Tomb of the Griffin Warrior at Pylos’, 5 pm on Monday 10 October in Room LG.17, Faculty of Law, Sidgwick Site. To reserve your place please reply to by Monday 3 October.

Temporary University Lectureships in Classics (Ancient History)

Aug 31, 2016

Applications are welcome for two temporary lectureships in Classics (Ancient History) from 01 January 2017. Please see the Jobs & Vacancies page for further information.

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