skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Mapping Falerii Novi, Italy

last modified Jun 09, 2020 09:00 AM
For the first time, archaeologists have succeeded in mapping a complete Roman city, Falerii Novi in Italy, using advanced ground penetrating radar (GPR), allowing them to reveal astonishing details while it remains deep underground. The technology could revolutionise our understanding of ancient settlements.

Martin Millett and Alessandro Launaro from the The Faculty of Classics with colleagues from Ghent University have discovered a bath complex, market, temple, a public monument unlike anything seen before, and even the city’s sprawling network of water pipes. By looking at different depths, the archaeologists can now study how the town evolved over hundreds of years.

The research, published in Antiquity, harnessed recent advances in GPR technology which make it possible to explore larger areas in higher resolution than ever before. This is likely to have major implications for the study of ancient cities because many cannot be excavated either because they are too large, or because they are trapped under modern structures.

RSS Feed Latest news

Publication of the Cambridge Greek Lexicon

Mar 31, 2021

The much-anticipated Cambridge Greek Lexicon will be published by Cambridge University Press (CUP) on 8th April 2021.

Professor Paul Cartledge receives one of Greece’s highest honours

Mar 30, 2021

Professor Paul Cartledge, Emeritus A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, received the Commander of the Order of Honour (Ταξιάρχης τῆς Τιμῆς), for his 'contribution to enhancing Greece's stature abroad'.

Teaching Classics in the time of Covid-19

Mar 02, 2021

Dr Renaud Gagné, Director of Undergraduate Studies, discusses the on-going challenges and adaptations made by the Faculty as the Covid-19 crisis continues and Lent term began under a renewed lockdown.

Research in Lockdown: fieldwork postponed

Mar 01, 2021

Rachel Phillips describes some of the challenges faced during the pandemic by doctoral students engaged in full time research.

View all news