skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

How we teach

How we teach is as important as what we teach. All students in Classics benefit from centrally organised tuition and colleges will arrange for small-group supervision. Colleges also provide you with a Director of Studies in Classics, who will help you maximise your potential. (You can find out who directs studies at a particular college here.)

This variety of provision allows us to offer a unique level of care and flexibility. Lectures are offered on all parts of the course as well as in some areas cut across disciplines, while classes (especially in Part 2) allow you to debate issues and formulate your own arguments.

Likewise, throughout your degree course, college (or “supervision”) offers you the chance to study the ancient world in depth, often emphasising a different angle from the lectures. The format of supervisions varies with the supervisor. Most often, you will write an essay in advance and discuss it with your supervisor and one or two other students. There is a real opportunity to work on each individual’s intellectual development. Supervisions train you to think critically and independently.

In addition to lectures and seminars, the Classics Faculty houses the Museum of Classical Archaeology on its first floor. This contains one of the finest collections of casts of classical sculpture in the world. It also has an excellent pottery collection. These are regularly used in art and archaeology teaching. Moreover, students taking archaeology courses can sign up to visit or even help excavate a variety of sites, both in Britain and the Mediterranean.

The library downstairs completes the picture. Not only is it a wonderful resource for primary and secondary literature on open access, but it is a comfortable and light space to work in. Undergraduates, graduates and lecturing staff find it a friendly and productive place to work.

RSS Feed Latest news

Unveiling the Invisible: Analysing Roman pottery

Feb 25, 2021

Archaeologists Alessandro Launaro, Senior Lecturer, and Ninetta Leone, Research Associate, have been working as members of the Cambridge MACH group to develop mathematical approaches to the classification of Roman pottery, part of the “Unveiling the Invisible” project funded by the Leverhulme Trust.

The Faculty reports with great sadness the death of John Easterling

Feb 23, 2021

A Fellow of Trinity from 1958, and Secretary of Trinity College Council for very many years, John was a University Assistant Lecturer in Classics (Ancient Philosophy) before he was appointed to the Office of University Draftsman at the Old Schools. John died on 23 February after a long illness.

Facilitating school visits and learning Latin with MoCA

Feb 23, 2021

Justyna Ladosz, Education and Outreach Coordinator in the Museum of Classical Archaeology, explains how she continues to facilitate lessons for school groups whilst the Museum remains closed, and how the Faculty’s students continue to deliver the Learn Latin with MoCA project.

Rebecca Flemming has been appointed a Joukowsky Lecturer

Feb 23, 2021

Dr Rebecca Flemming, Senior Lecturer in Ancient History and Fellow of Jesus College, has been appointed as a Joukowsky Lecturer for the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) for 2020-21. Rebecca also recently featured on BBC Radio 4’s In Our Time discussing the Justinianic Plague.

View all news