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The Faculty of Classics in Cambridge is one of the world’s leading centres for the study of the art & archaeology of ancient Greece. Our graduates are preferentially sought for appointments in universities throughout Britain and America, while their publications have generated a worldwide response. Our alumni specialising in Greek art & archaeology include, among many others, John Bennet (British School at Athens), Cyprian Broodbank (Cambridge), Jonathan Hall (Chicago), Catherine Morgan (Oxford), Ian Morris (Stanford), Lisa Nevett (Ann Arbor), Gillian Shepherd (La Trobe), and James Whitley (Cardiff).

Several distinguished archaeologists and art historians taught in the Faculty of Classics: from Charles Walston, excavator of the Argive Heraeum, and Alan Wace, excavator of Mycenae and pioneer in the archaeological investigation of ancient Thessaly and Macedonia, to Robert Cook and his groundbreaking work on Greek Painted Pottery, and Antony Snodgrass who created one of the most influential schools of Mediterranean Archaeology. Between 1978 and 1991, Anthony Snodgrass (with John Bintliff) directed a regional archaeological study of large areas of ancient Boeotia in central Greece – a region still at the heart of research for the Faculty of Classics, with the ongoing excavations of the Mycenaean cemetery at Prosilio near Orchomenos (a project co-directed by Dr Yannis Galanakis and the Ephorate of Antiquities of Boeotia).

The Faculty is home to the Museum of Classical Archaeology which comprises more than 600 plaster casts of Greek and Roman sculpture, around 4,500 paper squeezes of ancient inscriptions, and some 10,000 objects, mostly sherds from excavations of sites in the eastern Mediterranean, such as Knossos, Mycenae, the Athenian Agora and Naukratis. The Faculty also houses important archival collections, including the A.J.B. Wace Mycenae Archive, a photographic library and a substantial collection of slides (now largely digitised).

Our current team includes Prof. Robin Osborne (archaic and classical art & archaeology), Dr Yannis Galanakis (Bronze and Iron Age Aegean) and Dr Nigel Spivey (Greek sculpture and pottery, Etruscan art & archaeology). Prof. Cyprian Broodbank (archaeology and long-term history of the Mediterranean, Bronze Age Greece) is the Director of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research and also a member of the Classical archaeology group.

Latest news

Regius Professorship of Greek

16 January 2023

The Faculty is delighted to announce that Professor Tim Whitmarsh FBA has been elected Regius Professor of Greek from 1 April 2023. He is currently the A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture in the University. Looking ahead to his new role, Professor Whitmarsh commented: ’I am thrilled and honoured to be taking up this...

Mary Beard receives THE Outstanding Achievement Award

18 November 2022

Professor Mary Beard received the Outstanding Achievement Award at the 2022 Times Higher Education Awards . The citation hailed how she had “broken through the ivory tower’s walls and brought her unique enthusiasm for her subject – and crucially, what it can teach us about contemporary life and politics – to the world”...

University Assistant Professorship in Classics

15 November 2022

The Faculty of Classics is seeking to appoint an Assistant Professor in Classics (Ancient Greek History and/or Archaeology) from 1 September 2023. The role is open to those, at any stage in their career, with a primary research interest in Archaic/Classical/Hellenistic Greek History and/or Archaeology. We welcome...

Brian Leech Memorial Fund

10 November 2022

The Faculty of Classics is delighted to announce the establishment of the Brian Leech Memorial Fund. The Fund comes about thanks to a generous donation by Emma Gleave, and is made in memory of her late father, Brian Leech. Brian Leech had a long and successful career as both barrister and judge. He also greatly enjoyed classical studies – with a life-long passion for ancient Greek and Latin languages.