skip to content
 

Aims and objectives

  1. To develop students’ understanding of the structure and functioning of the Greek and Latin languages.
  2. To further students’ command of Greek and Latin vocabulary.
  3. To encourage in students an appreciation of different Greek and Latin prose and/or verse styles.
  4. To give students the opportunity, which many will not have been offered at school, to enjoy writing Greek and Latin themselves.

 

Scope and structure of the examination papers 2022–23

Paper 7. Translation into Greek Prose and Verse 

This paper will be divided into three Sections. Candidates will be required to attempt one Section only. Candidates for Paper 1 may attempt either Section (a) or Section (c). Candidates for Paper 2 may attempt any one of the three Sections. Credit will be given for knowledge of the general principles of Greek accentuation.

Section (a) contains four passages of English for translation into Greek (candidates should attempt only one):

  1. a passage of law-court oratory from Lysias
  2. a philosophical dialogue (i.e. a ‘question-and-answer’ passage) from Plato
  3. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek iambics
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek elegiacs

Section (b) contains one passage of English prose based on Lysias 1, for translation into Greek prose.

Section (c) contains four passages of English for translation into Greek, each approximately half the length of those set in Section (a). Candidates should attempt two passages, at least one of which should be verse.

  1. a passage of law-court oratory from Lysias
  2. a philosophical dialogue (i.e. a ‘question-and-answer’ passage) from Plato
  3. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek iambics                                                   
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Greek elegiacs

 

Paper 8. Translation into Latin Prose and Verse

This paper will be divided into three Sections. Candidates will be required to attempt one Section only. Candidates for Paper 3 may attempt either Section (a) or Section (c). Candidates for Paper 4 may attempt any one of the three Sections.

Section (a) contains four passages of English for translation into Latin (candidates should attempt only one):

  1. a ‘freestyle’ prose passage from any modern author
  2. a passage of oratory from Cicero
  3. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin hexameters
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin elegiacs

Section (b) contains one passage of English prose based on one of the Latin prose texts prescribed for Part 1A.

Section (c) contains four passages of English for translation into Latin, each approximately half the length of those set in Section (a). Candidates should attempt two passages, at least one of which should be verse.

  1. a ‘freestyle’ prose passage from any modern author
  2. a passage of oratory from Cicero
  3. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin hexameters
  4. a passage of poetry for translation into Latin elegiacs

 

Course description

Most of the teaching for these papers is provided through college supervisions. However, the Faculty offers the following course:

WRITING GREEK AND LATIN

WEISS
(16 C: Michaelmas and Lent)

Prose composition is a valuable tool for learning Greek and Latin: it reinforces our knowledge of the languages and gives us a chance to be creative with them! This course is designed for complete beginners but those who would like to improve their skills are most welcome. Lectures are presented in the form of an informal workshop (though no preparation or participation is required) and normally alternate between Ancient Greek and Latin. In Michaelmas we concentrate on basic forms and expressions and in Lent we move into classic subordinate clauses, ultimately with a view of imitating Plato and Cicero. Those interested in verse composition will find this course useful but they should also contact their Director of Studies to arrange for supervisions in verse. Those offering a Greek composition paper will be aided by the course on Greek accents.

Latest news

John Donaldson

27 September 2022

The Museum of Classical Archaeology is very sad to report the death on 21 September 2022 of its former Assistant Curator, John Donaldson. John worked in the Museum from 1988 until his retirement in in March 2013. Indeed, the Museum looks the way it does in large part because of John, who was as happy painting bases as he...

Joyce Reynolds FBA (1918–2022)

12 September 2022

The Faculty of Classics is deeply saddened by the news of the death of Joyce Reynolds FBA. She was Reader Emerita in Roman Historical Epigraphy, Fellow of the British Academy, and Honorary Fellow of Newnham College, where she was Director of Studies in Classics from 1951 to 1979. She was awarded the Gold Medal of the...

BBC Radio 4 - Reflections on Majesty, Mary Beard

12 September 2022

Mary Beard is one of ten writers and scholars invited by the BBC to reflect on their experience of the reign of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Follow the link below to listen: Listen here

Visual Interactions in Early Writing Systems (VIEWS) awarded ERC grant

16 March 2022

Philippa Steele, Senior Research Associate at the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, has been awarded a grant of 2 million euros by the European Research Council (ERC) to investigate the visual properties of pre-modern writing. The five-year project, Visual Interactions in Early Writing Systems (VIEWS), will...