skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Special lectures

J. H. Gray Lectures


 

The Corbett Lecture 

 

The Corbett Lecture is an annual lecture by a distinguished scholar on a theme connected with ancient Greece. The list of past Corbett Lectures can be found HERE.

Did you know that we also have a collection of audio recordings of some of the previous Corbett lectures? These can be found HERE. 

The Corbett lectures are open to all members of the University and others who are interested, so please do feel free to come along.


 

Craven Seminar - POSTPONED

The Faculty of Classics is pleased to announce The Craven Seminar, marking the centenary of John Chadwick, one of the pioneers of Mycenaean Studies. The seminar, entitled John Chadwick and the Future of Mycenaean Studies, is hosted by the E Caucus. The preliminary programme is available here. When we have a rescheduled date we will update this information. 

 


J.H. Gray Lectures

JH Gray poster 2018

May 2018 programme:
Tuesday 8 May, 5 p.m. 
Salus: hierarchy, reciprocity, and embodied safety
Wednesday 9 May, 2 p.m. seminar: Cura: anxiety and tending in Vergil and Horace
Thursday 10 May, 5 p.m.  Securitas: emperor and citizen


The Laurence Seminar

Laurence Seminar Dec 2017 poster

Example 2017 programme

11th December

  • 9-9.30: Coffee
  • 9.30-10: Welcome (M. Adamo, Cambridge)
  • Session 1: Expansion to Exaction: Italy and the Provinces. Part 1 (Chair: M. Adamo, Cambridge)
  • 10-11: Jonathan Prag (Oxford), Republican Auxiliaries.
  • 11-12: Toni Ñaco del Hoyo (ICREA, Girona), Provincial Tithes and Roman Army Supply in the Second Century BC.
  • 12-1pm: Lunch
  • Session 2: Expansion to Exaction: Italy and the Provinces. Part 2 (Chair: G. Bradley, Cardiff)
  • 1-2pm: James Tan (Sydney), The Fiscality of Citizens, Latins and Allies.
  • 2-3pm: Jerôme France (Bordeaux) A Plundering Empire? Fiscality and Imperialism in the 2nd Century BC.
  • 3-3.30pm: Coffee
  • Session 3: The view from the other side: taxpayers and communities. (Chair: R. Flemming, Cambridge)
  • 3.30-4.30pm: Cristina Soraci (Catania), To pay, or not to pay? People and taxation in the Middle Roman Republic.
  • 4.30-5.30pm: Giovanni Salmeri (Pisa), The Power of Institutions: The Hieronian Law and Its Impact on the Sicilian Cities and Countryside.
  • 8pm: conference dinner (Cambridge Chop House, King’s Parade).

12th December

  • 9-9.30: Coffee
  • Session 4: Mars’s Account Books: Public or Private? Part 1 (Chair: J. Patterson, Cambridge)
  • 9.30-10.30: Debbie Potter (Oxford), Roman Policies in Gallic Northern Italy in the Middle Republic: cui bono?
  • 10.30-11.30: Sylvie Pittia (Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), When Romans did not win the war: reflections on some fiscal consequences of defeat in the Middle Republic.
  • 11.30-12: Coffee
  • Session 5: Mars’s Account Books: Public or Private? Part 2 (Chair: S. Piacentin, KCL)
  • 12-1pm: Saskia Roselaar (Bochum), A System of Hegemony? Rome’s Approach to Spoils of War in the Middle Republic.
  • 1-2pm: Lunch
  • 2-3pm: Marta García-Morcillo (Roehampton), Hasta, Praeco, Aerarium: From War Booty to Public Auctions.
  • 3-3.30pm: Concluding remarks (S. Piacentin, KCL).

RSS Feed Latest news

Cambridge Classical Studies Series & Gold Open Access

Jul 01, 2020

The Faculty of Classics is delighted to have reached an agreement with Cambridge University Press by which, for the next three years, five volumes a year in the Cambridge Classical Studies Series (monographs on Classical topics written by academics working in or recently trained in Cambridge) will be published Gold Open Access without charge to the author or the Faculty. This is a significant initiative, designed to maximise the impact of the excellent Classical research being done in Cambridge.

Virtual Open Days 2-3 July 2020

Jun 29, 2020

Check out our new Virtual Hub for the latest online content from Cambridge Classics, including links to this week's Virtual Open Days for prospective undergraduates

Mapping Falerii Novi, Italy

Jun 09, 2020

For the first time, archaeologists have succeeded in mapping a complete Roman city, Falerii Novi in Italy, using advanced ground penetrating radar (GPR), allowing them to reveal astonishing details while it remains deep underground. The technology could revolutionise our understanding of ancient settlements.

Teaching Associate in Classics

Jun 05, 2020

Details of how to apply for this part time fixed term teaching post are now avilable online. Deadline Monday 6th July 2020.

View all news