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Dalia Pratali Maffei

Dalia Pratali Maffei

Department: Classics

Supervisor: Prof. James Clackson

College: Jesus

Thesis Title (preliminary): The Language of Hellenistic Inscribed Epigrams from Doric-speaking Areas. A Comparative Approach


Biography:

Dalia is a PhD student at the University of Cambridge. Her PhD research is on the language of literary and inscribed Hellenistic epigrams, with a focus on Doric areas. Her aim is to give a broader understanding on the relationship between inscribed and literary language in the Ancient world.

She obtained her BA and MA in Classics from Ca’ Foscari (Venice), with a BA thesis on Linguistic Taboo in Menander's Comedy and an MA thesis on the Inscribed Epigrams of Hellenistic Sicily. During her MA she spent one year at UCL as Erasmus student and she attended Ca' Foscari International College, with a Minor in Global Asian Studies. Her College Thesis investigates the Linguistic Landscape of London and Paris International Stations.

Other Academic Interests

Indo-European, ancient and modern sociolinguistics, multilingualism and language conservatism in late Antiquity, Greek epigraphy.

RSS Feed Latest news

Publication of the Cambridge Greek Lexicon

Mar 31, 2021

The much-anticipated Cambridge Greek Lexicon will be published by Cambridge University Press (CUP) on 8th April 2021.

Professor Paul Cartledge receives one of Greece’s highest honours

Mar 30, 2021

Professor Paul Cartledge, Emeritus A.G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, received the Commander of the Order of Honour (Ταξιάρχης τῆς Τιμῆς), for his 'contribution to enhancing Greece's stature abroad'.

Teaching Classics in the time of Covid-19

Mar 02, 2021

Dr Renaud Gagné, Director of Undergraduate Studies, discusses the on-going challenges and adaptations made by the Faculty as the Covid-19 crisis continues and Lent term began under a renewed lockdown.

Research in Lockdown: fieldwork postponed

Mar 01, 2021

Rachel Phillips describes some of the challenges faced during the pandemic by doctoral students engaged in full time research.

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