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Dr Philip Boyes

Dr Philip Boyes

Research Associate, ERC ‘Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems’ Project

CREWS Project
Faculty of Classics
Sidgwick Avenue
Cambridge
CB3 9DA

Research Interests

The East Mediterranean and especially the Levant in the Late Bronze and Early Iron Age; trade and cultural interaction; the archaeology of writing systems.

As a member of the CREWS Project led by Dr Philippa Steele, my postdoctoral work explores the context of writing at Ugarit, and especially the creation and use of the Ugaritic alphabetic cuneiform script in the Late Bronze Age. It will combine archaeological, epigraphic and linguistic approaches to situate Ugaritic writing within its social and cultural context and explore its relationship to other Levantine writing systems.

My doctoral research, ‘Social Change in “Phoenicia” in the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age transition’ assessed the area corresponding roughly to modern Lebanon from around the 13th to 10th centuries BC and examined social change; in particular the region’s relationship to the wider picture of ‘collapse’ and instability in the East Mediterranean at this time. Theoretical issues considered included the nature and definitions of social change, methodologies for exploring poorly-attested archaeological periods, and the use of textual sources in early historical periods.

Key Publications

Social Change in ‘Phoenicia’ in the Late Bronze/Early Iron Age Transition. PhD Dissertation. University of Cambridge (2013). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17863/CAM.4927

‘“The King of the Sidonians”: Phoenician Ideologies and the Myth of the Kingdom of Tyre-Sidon’. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 365, 33-44 (2012) DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5615/bullamerschoorie.365.0033

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We are keen to support high quality applications that intersect with research already being undertaken or developed in the Classics Faculty.

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