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Religious Pollution: negotiating extremes in Greek antiquity

Cambridge Festival of Ideas talk with Dr Hannah Willey
When Oct 20, 2018
from 03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Where Faculty of Classics, Room G.19
Contact Name
Contact Phone 01223 330402
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Whatever else it was, Greek religion was also a way of trying to understand an often chaotic and bewildering world. The idea of religious pollution or miasma represented one of the most intriguing ways in which the Greeks tried to grapple with the extremes of human life - birth and death - as well as the extremes of human experience - homicide, plagues, famines. If pollution can result when order is disrupted or a line is crossed, who gets to determine the order or draw the line? Join Dr Hannah Willey as she asks: what is at stake in managing pollution?

Free. For adults. Pre-book.

Book online here

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This event is part of the 2018 Cambridge Festival of Ideas, a season of over 200 events, exhibitions and performances across the City and University of Cambridge. 

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